Menue

Publications

Title Assembly of metal-phenolic/catecholamine networks for synergistically anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anticoagulant coatings
Date 07.11.2018
Number 56021
Abstract The development of a facile and versatile strategy to endow surfaces with synergistically anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anticoagulant functions is of particular significance for blood-contacting biomaterials and medical devices. In this work, we report a simple and environmentally friendly “one-pot” method inspired by byssal cuticle chemistry, namely, [Fe(dopa)3] coordination chemistry for assembly of copper ions (Cu2+) and plant polyphenol (tannic acid)/catecholamine (dopamine or norepinephrine) to form metal–phenolic/catecholamine network-based coatings. This one-pot method enabled us to easily develop a multifunctional surface based on the combination of the characteristic functions of metal ions and plant polyphenol or catecholamine. The residual phenolic hydroxyl groups on the coatings imparted the modified surface with excellent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. The robust chelation of copper ions to the metal–phenolic/catecholamine networks provided not only durable antibacterial property but also glutathione peroxidase like catalytic capability to continuously and controllably produce antithrombotic nitric oxide by catalyzing endogenous S-nitrothiol. The biological functions of such coatings could be well regulated by adjusting the ratios of the feed concentration of Cu2+ ions to plant polyphenol or catecholamine. We envision that our simple, multifunctional, and bioinspired coating strategy can hold great application promise for bioengineering blood-contacting devices.
Publisher ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
Identifier
Citation ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 10 (2018) 40844-40853
DOI https://doi.org/10.1021/acsami.8b14409
Authors Li, X. ; Gao, P. ; Tan, J. ; Xiong, K. ; Maitz, M.F. ; Pan, C. ; Wu, H. ; Chen, Y. ; Yang, Z. ; Huang, N.
Tags anti-inflammation anticoagulation antimicrobial catalysis metal-phenolic networks self-assembly surface functionalization

Back to list